demons often enjoy the weather conditions associated with high altitude pressure.



scenicroutes:

naruhodos:

is this the rise of the brave tangled frozen dragons

no actually it’s even better than that
this is a still from a 1990 television special entitled, “cartoon all-stars to the rescue,” which, literally, was absolutely nothing but half an hour of beloved children’s cartoon characters attempting to get that kid in the blue to stop smoking pot.
it opens with a brief clip of george h.w. bush and barbara bush sitting in the oval office, petting their dog. the president of the united states looks into the camera and says, “some of your favourite cartoon characters will help you understand how drugs and alcohol can ruin your life.”
and that brief clip alone would be worth the price of admission but then we get into the actual story, which begins with a teenage boy smashing his kid sister’s piggy bank to buy pot. while alvin and the chipmunks look on in abject terror. and winnie the pooh exclaims, “oh my!” and then the kid runs off to buy pot in an alley and bugs bunny appears out of nowhere dressed as a cop, picks a joint off the pavement, and launches into an anti-drug spiel.
it’s actually really not the kind of thing that can be put into words so here’s the full half-hour video, knock yourself out

scenicroutes:

naruhodos:

is this the rise of the brave tangled frozen dragons

no actually it’s even better than that

this is a still from a 1990 television special entitled, “cartoon all-stars to the rescue,” which, literally, was absolutely nothing but half an hour of beloved children’s cartoon characters attempting to get that kid in the blue to stop smoking pot.

it opens with a brief clip of george h.w. bush and barbara bush sitting in the oval office, petting their dog. the president of the united states looks into the camera and says, “some of your favourite cartoon characters will help you understand how drugs and alcohol can ruin your life.”

and that brief clip alone would be worth the price of admission but then we get into the actual story, which begins with a teenage boy smashing his kid sister’s piggy bank to buy pot. while alvin and the chipmunks look on in abject terror. and winnie the pooh exclaims, “oh my!” and then the kid runs off to buy pot in an alley and bugs bunny appears out of nowhere dressed as a cop, picks a joint off the pavement, and launches into an anti-drug spiel.

it’s actually really not the kind of thing that can be put into words so here’s the full half-hour video, knock yourself out

thatswhywelovegermany:

Castle of Ribbeck, Nauen, District of Havelland, Brandenburg

The history of the noble family von Ribbeck can be dated back until 1237. A domicile of the family in the village of Ribbeck was first mentioned in 1375. The family became famous through a poem by Theodor Fontane telling the story of the lord of Ribbeck who used to give away pears to the children and cared for the case of his death by having planted a pear tree on his grave, knowing that his son was too greedy to follow the tradition of generosity. Probably every German has to learn the poem in school.

The predecessor of the current castle from 1826 was a one-storey building with a characteristic roof, described in Theodor Fontane’s poem as “double-roofed house”, a form of a half-hipped roof. Why this building was redeveloped into the current castle in the 1890s is not known.

Family von Ribbeck was expropriated by the socialist government of East Germany in 1947, and the district of Nauen took possession of the castle. The coat of arms and a wall painting displaying the old Ribbeck generously giving away pears to a bunch of children were removed and the interior was rebuilt to accomodate a care retirement home. The wall painting was replaced by a relief showing a fat landowner eating pears while starving children are kneeling in front of him, begging – a socialist-style perversion of the famous poem by Theodor Fontane.

After the German reunification, family von Ribbeck claimed the estate back, but lost in a trial. It is still owned by the district of Havelland and was renovated in the following years. It is home to a museum portraying Theodor Fontane, a café, a civil registration office for marriages, and functional rooms for wedding celebrations. Family von Ribbeck occupies two houses in the village, one of them in the immediate neighborhood of the castle.

The original pear tree sung about in the poem broke down during a storm in 1911. Its trunk is on display in the church. In 2000, a new pear tree was planted at the old site, replacing a specimen from the 1970s, which disappointingly produced only few pears of low quality.

thatswhywelovegermany:

Castle of Ribbeck, Nauen, District of Havelland, Brandenburg

The history of the noble family von Ribbeck can be dated back until 1237. A domicile of the family in the village of Ribbeck was first mentioned in 1375. The family became famous through a poem by Theodor Fontane telling the story of the lord of Ribbeck who used to give away pears to the children and cared for the case of his death by having planted a pear tree on his grave, knowing that his son was too greedy to follow the tradition of generosity. Probably every German has to learn the poem in school.

The predecessor of the current castle from 1826 was a one-storey building with a characteristic roof, described in Theodor Fontane’s poem as “double-roofed house”, a form of a half-hipped roof. Why this building was redeveloped into the current castle in the 1890s is not known.

Family von Ribbeck was expropriated by the socialist government of East Germany in 1947, and the district of Nauen took possession of the castle. The coat of arms and a wall painting displaying the old Ribbeck generously giving away pears to a bunch of children were removed and the interior was rebuilt to accomodate a care retirement home. The wall painting was replaced by a relief showing a fat landowner eating pears while starving children are kneeling in front of him, begging – a socialist-style perversion of the famous poem by Theodor Fontane.

After the German reunification, family von Ribbeck claimed the estate back, but lost in a trial. It is still owned by the district of Havelland and was renovated in the following years. It is home to a museum portraying Theodor Fontane, a café, a civil registration office for marriages, and functional rooms for wedding celebrations. Family von Ribbeck occupies two houses in the village, one of them in the immediate neighborhood of the castle.

The original pear tree sung about in the poem broke down during a storm in 1911. Its trunk is on display in the church. In 2000, a new pear tree was planted at the old site, replacing a specimen from the 1970s, which disappointingly produced only few pears of low quality.

hiddlesluscious:

//Favorite Photoshoot// (#6)

revedas:

babynatxo:

dandelionpunx:

Whoever wants to eat cookie dough and not get salmonella. Here ya go!

omg

Every woman? EVERY PERSON ON EARTH, MARS, OR WHEREVER THE HELL YOU ARE SHOULD HAVE THIS RECIPE.

revedas:

babynatxo:

dandelionpunx:

Whoever wants to eat cookie dough and not get salmonella. Here ya go!

omg

Every woman? EVERY PERSON ON EARTH, MARS, OR WHEREVER THE HELL YOU ARE SHOULD HAVE THIS RECIPE.

pumpkinkraken:

headcanons for faceless/non-human characters b like

pumpkinkraken:

headcanons for faceless/non-human characters b like

notenoughsockmonkeys:

So my parents bought me this thing called the Selfie Stick

image

And pretty much you attach your phone to the stick and you can take pictures using the little clicker thing. So instead of taking photos like this:

image

I can take photos like this:

image

caseyanthonyofficial:

It’s 2014

caseyanthonyofficial:

It’s 2014

serration:

prejaculate:

i can’t hang out tomorrow i’m too busy doing nothing alone sorry

i had way too much fun with this

theme